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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
, large like new york city, was pounded and pounded and pounded by this devastating hurricane. all america watched, we all held our breath, we all feared the worst, and we saw the worst. and, at the same time, we saw the indomitable spirit of the american people hanging onto their home, praying for their livelihood, and while all that was going on and the president visited, the governors on both sides of the aisle, to say you've got the united states of america behind you. well, the united states of america being behind you, whether you're governor o'malley or governor christie or governor cuomo or the other goafns means that we -- governors means that we need to pass this bill, and we want to pass it because we know that lives were devastated and livelihoods were ruined. in maryland, gosh, we faced these unique challenges -- hurricanes, blizzards, urban and rural communities affected. and our own lower shore, some somerset county was hit. that has one of the highest unemployment rates in the city -- in the state, close to 10%. 18% of the residents moved below a line of 35 $$35,000 a year.
they lived in a part of america, particularly a rural area, or an older industrialized city, where the economy has just not come back as rapidly as it has in some better off parts of the country. this is a circumstance that people are in largely because of their region, not because of laziness, certainly. and also, not because of race or age or all the other factors. those factors are always there, and they're always important. but there are some really targeted regional sufferings that are taking place. >> let's be honest here. you mentioned race, gender, we can talk about class. those are the factors that have not motivated many americans to be as empathetic as they might otherwise be. but you would think that the notion that somebody they knew, some uncles, some cousins, some person in your family who's out of work through no fault or his or her own would at least garner the empathy of these folks in congress. why hasn't it worked? >> i think they've written these folks off. and you've written about this, and you know well, that the politics of america is defined increasingly no
, that is likely to conclude that the state department was largely at fault for failures, security failures prior to benghazi. so to blame susan rice who's over at the u.n. mostly in new york city for benghazi is really a stretch. she was the werngs who went out on sunday television. and she said today to brian williams that she is not blameless. i think there was a lack of care with the talking points and the republicans seized on it and claims she was being political and trying to be political at a key point in the presidential election campaign, which she strongly denies. >> but you're saying that the president's statements to that effect were not enough because they were not backed up with essentially procedural support for her to be fighting these attacks that could have happened had he nominated her. >> once she's nominated she is armed with the white house counsel's office-w every wise person, man or woman in washington who would be assigned to her to get her through the nomination process. but she was left -- she said she didn't feel that she's a victim here, but she certainly did acknowl
. >> eliot: as well we should. editor at large of the atlantic, steve clemons president of ploughshares fund, joe cirincione. seemingly they're right back where they started. what speakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakak nobody knows disasters like comedians. >> new york, the high-tech resilient city. just don't get us wet. what the hell was that? >> that's from my upcoming benefit for victims of hurricane sandy. i booked the strongest, smartest comics i could find. my comedian friends and i will raise money to rebuild homes and lives one laugh at a time. >> awe damn, the lights are out! you know what? i'll watch a little television until they come back on. >> only on current tv. >> eliot: on the 18 -- only 18 days remain until we go over the so-called fiscal cliff and with congress once again heading home after another grueling two-day work week, president obama met once again with speaker boehner. while the president keeps talking about revenues, speaker boehner focuses on expenditures and it is hard to tell if any progress is being made.
for washington's city -- he submitted the design for a palace. the americans were not having a palace. in 1821, european diplomats told the congress it was neither large nor awe-inspiring. if that were larger and more elegant, perhaps a president would be inclined to be its permanent resident. >> a photo credit has gathered a few of her favorite white house photos. watch sunday evening at 7:30 p.m. eastern on c-span3. >> my inspiration was the idea that the wanted to explain how it happened. we do know the story of the cold war. we have seen the archives that describe relationships between roosevelt, stalin, churchill, and then truman. what i wanted to show what did it feel like to be one of the people who were subjected to this system and how did people make choices in that system and how did they behave. one of the things that has happened since 1989 is the region that we used to call eastern europe has become very differentiated. these countries no longer have much in common with one another. >> more about life in soviet east germany from the end of world war ii through 1956 from her histor
governments both large and small, the state of new york city dwovet -- government and so many others that are waiting to see if they will get some relief sew they can move tor ward with their plans. we beat back host of the crippling amendments. we beat back all of the crippling amendments an most of the amendments -- and most of the amendments. it's a very, very trying day, i think, for the senate. the century old tradition of different parts of the country rallying to help those that are beleaguered because of the difficult natural disasters continuing and the fact that 12 republicans voted for a bill that contain virtually no offsets except for the one amendment that passed last week. that is a full bill, a whole bill, a bill that gets new york and new jersey rapidly on the road to recovery fills us with hope that we can get something done and get something done quickly. when we press, when we explain to our colleagues what we needed and the desperation in here, they listened carefully. and we're really very, very glad about that. let me say a few specific things. there is very am
areas, that he's surrounded by a large contingent of loyal fighters. but that narrative is pre- 9/11 understanding of ubl. the second narrative, he's living in the city, living in a city with multiple points of egress and entry, access to communications, so that he can keep in touch with the organization. you can't run a global network of interconnected cells from a cave. >> that was a clip of the new movie called "zero dark thirty," chronicles this mission highlighting many of the people in the takedown including this young woman in seeking, finding, killing osama bin laden. in this new report from "the washington post," this mystery cia operative has a very complicated life, even more so after the bin laden raid. joining me from washington is greg miller, the intelligence reporter with the post, with "the washington post." welcome. >> thanks. >> what an article. i read it and from what i can tell, and also listen to an interview with catherine bigelow. this cia operative found the link to the courier to drive this forward to find osama bin laden. who is she? what do you know? >>
of hartford. 60 miles outside of new york city. a decent sized town, population about 27,000. but the school district itself has about 5400 kids. it's a pretty large district. this school in particular, kindergarten through fourth grade as the wnyw helicopter moves closer to that town. alisyn: it's sandy hook elementary school. about that town it's a very, very pretty town. it has a lot of beautiful town squares, churches on corners with pretty old steeples. parts of it are historic. it shows that this sort of terror parents experience everywhere, sadly. this story happens everywhere and you can just imagine how parents are feeling as they are getting this news that something apparently has happened at this school today, and there were gunshots, and that someone is hurt, but beyond that it is hard to know if all the students are okay. we wish we could report that, but at this hour we don't have that information. bill: crime is very few to this town, very low. one violent criminal offense in 2010 is are being reported in newtown, connecticut. okay, we're working through this. we'll be on the
and about box and the point i was trying to stress is i think the u.s. writ large, the government and also the civil society organizations and others were standing on the side lines here. they have to do private city along the same line. right now i think the u.s. policy, and again, u.s. government policy that those of you i think in the civil society and others were sitting on the sidelines here where there's a desire among the political forces including the under islamists who want to bring about change in their political movement and were for the large part sitting on the side line here and we need to do more. >> we do need to move on to the q&a portion here. i would like to take a few questions from the audience the if you have a question raise your hand. we have migrants' circulating and we will take ten minutes before we begin to wrap up. >> i'm on the center for democracy and human rights in saudi arabia in washington, d.c. what's missing over on these discussions which i tend to miss them less and less is the fact that islamists haven't been told all along. the other point is there
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)